Bindi Sued Me As An Aborigine. Now Admits: ‘I Am Also White.’

Posted on Thu 11/15/2018 by

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By Andrew Bolt ~

This is something between welcome and too late.  But I do admire her honesty and intellectual integrity.

Bindi Cole was one of nine people identifying as Aboriginal who sued me for asking why they didn’t identify instead as white, or both Aboriginal and white, or as race irrelevant.

To my shock and horror, the Federal Court judge ruled I’d broken the Racial Discrimination Act and banned two of my articles.

Now Bindi Cole says she was wrong:

One of my identities is Aboriginal and I can’t stop being Aboriginal. I am what I am. But when I made that my sole identity it was confusing because I am also white.

So I was both the victim, the Aboriginal victim, but also the white oppressor. And then being female I was oppressed by the patriarchy.

It was always these kind of ways of identifying that meant that I was always a victim of so many different things that I didn’t actually have to take any responsibility for myself or for my behaviours whatsoever. I could constantly blame everything and everyone else.

The court case even turned her into a conservative:

I didn’t even understand I was on the Left until I went to a very public court case where I was exposed to conservative ideas for the very first time. It wasn’t until I was confronted with these ideas that I realised what a bubble I had actually been living in…

What I was was a social justice warrior and a virtue signaller. And I constantly looked down on other people who didn’t have the same ideas as I had and I was intolerant of them, too…

The more that I read and the more that I watched the more I realised I had been on the wrong side, completely on the wrong side.

Watch.

So what now for the Federal Court. One of the people it claimed I’d racially offended now concedes my argument.

I should add that Cole also confirms a key argument I put and which the judge rejected: that race was in this case, at least, a question of choice. Cole and the others could choose how they identified.

The judge decided race was not a question of choice.

As I wrote on the day he found against me:

In two columns in particular — and that’s where this misery started — I wrote about people who, it seemed to me, had other options than to call themselves, without qualification or hyphens, “Aboriginal”.

They included nine fair-skinned Aborigines who responded not with public arguments, but with a legal action in the Federal Court to have my articles banned forever, and me prevented from ever again writing something similar….

I’m talking about people such as an Aboriginal lawyer whose father was British, an Aboriginal activist whose own sister identified as non-Aboriginal, and an Aboriginal writer whose father was born in Austria….

Crucial to Justice Bromberg’s finding is that fair-skinned Aborigines such as the claimants do not choose their ethnic or “racial” identity, even though one of the nine in the court action against me conceded in court that her own sister disputed her account of their genealogy and did not consider herself to be Aboriginal.

If Justice Bromberg’s view is correct, I would be even more depressed than I am already.

It would have grave implications for our multi-ethnic or “multi-racial” community. Must we always be defined by our ancestry, trapped forever in some box of race? Is someone with even just 1/128th Aboriginal ancestry forever an Aborigine, and Aborigine only?

Well, yes, suggests Justice Bromberg’s judgment — as long as that person felt Aboriginal and other Aborigines approved.

But Bindi Cole just showed race is indeed a choice and can be changed, by now declaring: “I am also white.”

What now?

Andrew Bolt writes for the Herald Sun, Daily Telegraph, and The Advertiser and runs Australia’s most-read political blog. On week nights he hosts The Bolt Report on Sky News at 7pm and his Macquarie Radio show at 8pm with Steve Price.

Read more excellent articles from Andrew Bolt’s Blog . http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/

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