Sad! Stephen Colbert Tougher on Bernie’s Socialism Than CBS Journalists

Posted on Thu 08/16/2018 by

0


By Scott Whitlock ~ 

It’s sad when the liberal comedian on your network is tougher than most of the journalists. But that’s what happened on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning as socialist Bernie Sanders made two CBS appearances. Late Night host Stephen Colbert repeatedly pressed Sanders on the problems with promoting socialism in America. Over on CBS This Morning, however, the efforts were half-hearted at best.

After conceding that some liberals are excited about fellow socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Colbert grilled Sanders: “But the people she campaigned for did not win their primaries. Only half the people you campaigned for won their primaries so far. So, maybe there’s a little taint to socialism that turns people off.”

The comedian demanded: “But why do you need to call yourself socialist because that is freighted with so much negativity in the United States?” Colbert started with just trying to get the facts. Referencing Ocasio-Cortez, he looked for a definition: “Both of you identify as democratic socialists. What does that mean?”

Now, to be clear, Colbert is still an extreme liberal. Towards the end of the interview, he offered this hard-left question about a possible “revolution”:

 If things are as bad as you say they are in terms of income inequality and the non-responsiveness of our elected leaders — and I believe you are right — where is the revolution?And how, if it ever comes, will it come? Because I quote maybe too much Kennedy saying about those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable, what is our chance at avoiding what will eventually become a clash of monied influence against the forgotten?

Still, at least Colbert pressed Sanders on socialism. On CBS This Morning, Wednesday, co-host John Dickerson wondered: “Tell me about the Democratic Party now, the ideas that are winning the day. Some of your candidates have won. Some of them have lost.”

He offered this softball on diversity: “What do you think about this history in the [Vermont] gubernatorial race? Christine Hallquist, the first transgender?” Dickerson gently asked of socialism: “The idea of socialism vs. capitalism, does that conversation need to be more in the present in the forefront?”

Finally, he worried about districts where…

…the idea of Medicare for all and the cost of that is a little too much for maybe the voters in those suburban swing districts. The idea of free college. They hear the numbers racking up in terms of the federal deficit. On the other hand, you talk about this energy inside the Democratic Party. So, how does the Democratic Party balance those two things?

On June 27, CBS This Morningjournalists avoided asking tough questions of the Ocasio-Cortez about her radical beliefs, including abolishing ICE.

A partial transcript of the Late Showsegment is below:

Late Show With Stephen Colbert
8/15/18 (east coast) 8/14/18 central and west coast
12:15AM

STEPHEN COLBERT: You’ve actually been campaigning with — she [Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez]. She used to work with you, for your campaign. And you’ve been out there with Alexandria Ocasio Cortez. And both of you identify as democratic socialists. What does that mean?

COLBERT:  Okay, so, other people, other people have espoused those ideas without calling themselves socialists. Ever since the New Deal and certainly since the Great Society, the Democratic Party has been associated with the social safety net and essentially been socialism-curious. But why do you need to call yourself socialist because that is freighted with so much negativity in the United States?

BERNIE SANDERS: I’ll tell you why.

COLBERT: Okay. I’m just saying that, people are very excited about Ocasio-Cortez. I’ve had her in the seat. She’s very impressive. But the people she campaigned for did not win their primaries. Only half the people you campaigned for won their primaries so far. So, maybe there’s a little taint to socialism that turns people off.

COLBERT: If things are as bad as you say they are in terms of income inequality and the non-responsiveness of our elected leaders — and I believe you are right — where is the revolution? And how, if it ever comes, will it come? Because I quote maybe too much Kennedy saying about those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable, what is our chance at avoiding what will eventually become a clash of monied influence against the forgotten?

Scott Whitlock is the associate editor for the Media Research Center’s NewsBusters.org site
Advertisements