Australian Base Load Electrical Power – Week Ending 21st July 2018

Posted on Sun 07/22/2018 by

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By Anton Lang ~

Week 55

This is the continuing Post, where each Saturday, I will detail the power consumption for the Base Load in Australia for the previous week. This will show what is actually meant by the term Base Load, and that is the minimum daily power consumption at its lowest point. Power consumption never falls below this point.

Here in Australia, that level of power is 18,000MW. (See data for the Running Weekly Average For Base Load below)

The Bayswater Coal Fired Power Plant In New South Wales

This data I have collated below is for this last week, and is for the five States connected to the Australian grids, every State east of the Western Australian border, and here I will show that data for each of those five States, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania.

As you can see from these numbers, that huge amount of power is being supplied mainly by coal fired power, and on most days that coal fired power provides 80% or more of that level of power, at that time, when power consumption is at its lowest level, that total of 18,000MW.

All of this data is taken at a single point in time, and that is at 4AM of every day, when nearly all of us are sound asleep.

For the Introduction and background for this Base Load, refer back to the original Post at this link.

This is the permanent link to all the Posts with the data from each week.

For the purposes of this data, the sources are as follows.

Total Power consumption for each State

Fossil Fuel totals and Coal Fired power totals

Hydro Power totals

Wind Power totals

All these totals are from 4AM on each day, the time of minimum power consumption.

There are no coal fired power plants in South Australia or in Tasmania.

*****

Sunday 15th July 2018

New South Wales – 7060MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Queensland – 5240MW (Coal Fired Power – 5300MW)

Victoria – 4090MW (Coal Fired Power – 4600MW)

South Australia – 1240MW

Tasmania – 1110MW

Total – 18740MW

Fossil Fuel – 16000MW (Total coal fired power – 15400MW  – 82.2% of the overall total of 18740MW)

Hydro – 1000MW

Wind – 2300MW (12.3% of the total)

Renewable power – 17.6% of the total.

Sunday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 28490MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 19100MW (67%)

Monday 16th July 2018

New South Wales – 7350MW (Coal Fired Power – 5400MW)

Queensland – 5260MW (Coal Fired Power – 5600MW)

Victoria – 4010MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1070MW

Tasmania – 1120MW

Total – 18810MW

Fossil Fuel – 15200MW (Total coal fired power – 14800MW  – 78.7% of the overall total of 18810MW)

Hydro – 1350MW

Wind – 3000MW (15.9% of the total)

Renewable power – 23.1% of the total.

Monday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 29910MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18900MW (63.2%)

Tuesday 17th July 2018

New South Wales – 7450MW (Coal Fired Power – 5600MW)

Queensland – 5330MW (Coal Fired Power – 5400MW)

Victoria – 4170MW (Coal Fired Power – 3700MW)

South Australia – 970MW

Tasmania – 1080MW

Total – 19000MW

Fossil Fuel – 15000MW (Total coal fired power – 14700MW  – 77.4% of the overall total of 19000MW)

Hydro – 1400MW

Wind – 3450MW (18.2% of the total)

Renewable power – 25.5% of the total.

Tuesday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 28490MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18800MW (66%)

Wednesday 18th July 2018

New South Wales – 6960MW (Coal Fired Power – 5300MW)

Queensland – 5380MW (Coal Fired Power – 5300MW)

Victoria – 4360MW (Coal Fired Power – 4200MW)

South Australia – 1120MW

Tasmania – 1080MW

Total – 18900MW

Fossil Fuel – 15300MW (Total coal fired power – 14800MW  – 78.3% of the overall total of 18900MW)

Hydro – 1450MW

Wind – 2750MW (14.6% of the total)

Renewable power – 22.2% of the total.

Wednesday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 27930MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18700MW (67%)

Thursday 19th July 2018

New South Wales – 7140MW (Coal Fired Power – 5400MW)

Queensland – 5420MW (Coal Fired Power – 5300MW)

Victoria – 4250MW (Coal Fired Power – 3900MW)

South Australia – 1130MW

Tasmania – 1040MW

Total – 18980MW

Fossil Fuel – 15100MW (Total coal fired power – 14600MW  – 76.9% of the overall total of 18980MW)

Hydro – 1400MW

Wind – 3400MW (17.9% of the total)

Renewable power – 25.3% of the total.

Thursday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 28270MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18800MW (66.5%)

Friday 20th July 2018

New South Wales – 6930MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Queensland – 5330MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Victoria – 4200MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1110MW

Tasmania – 1050MW

Total – 18820MW

Fossil Fuel – 15300MW (Total coal fired power – 14800MW  – 78.6% of the overall total of 18820MW)

Hydro – 1450MW

Wind – 2700MW (14.3% of the total)

Renewable power – 22.1% of the total.

Friday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 28510MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18500MW (64.9%)

Saturday 21st July 2018

New South Wales – 6980MW (Coal Fired Power – 6000MW)

Queensland – 5220MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Victoria – 4390MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1160MW

Tasmania – 1150MW

Total – 18900MW

Fossil Fuel – 16300MW (Total coal fired power – 15300MW  – 81% of the overall total of 18900MW)

Hydro – 1750MW

Wind – 1500MW (7.9% of the total)

Renewable power – 17.2% of the total.

Saturday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 27380MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 17900MW (65.4%)

*****

This Week’s Average For Base Load – 18879MW

This Week’s Average For Base Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 14915MW – 79%

Running Weekly Average For Base Load – 18059MW

Running Weekly Average For Base Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 14657MW – 81.2%

*****

This Week’s Average For Peak Load – 28426MW

This Week’s Average For Peak Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 18672MW – 65.7%

*****

Comments For This Last Week

We are now in the middle of Winter, and that minimum power consumption at this 4AM time is consistently well above the average of 18000MW, and this week, almost every morning it was around 19000MW, and that raise the average to around the Winter time average for this amount of power being consumed. As you can see, the average is now 18050MW Plus, and rises with each week.

The average supplied from coal fired power was a little lower than the 80% average for this week, and for most of this week, there were five Units off line, and for the last three days, seven of them have been off line. Even so, that average for the year so far is still firmly stuck above 81%.

One thing I have noticed is what is happening in the State of Victoria. They closed down the ancient plant at Hazelwood, and that plant supplied 25% of the State’s power, power that still had to be found as the consumption in the State didn’t just magically go down because they closed Hazelwood. What is happening now is that there are only two plants left in the State. There are 6 Units at the Loy Yang plant, two of them at Loy Yang B and four at Loy Yang A, and there are four Units at the Yallourn W plant, so ten Units in all.

Coal fired power across the other two States still with coal fired plants and Australia as a whole show that the coal fired portion of the overall total power being generated from that source closely follows the Load Curve for actual power consumption, in other words, it ramps up and down by anything up to 4000MW plus and minus during any normal operating day. Howvere, what is now happening with Hazelwood closes is that those remaining ten Units are now running at their maximum whenever they are running. There is no load following aspect to their power delivery. They are either on and running at their maximum, or off line. That has been the case ever since Hazelwood closed down. They can do this without any major problems, but it must be adding to the wear and tear on those Units, and there is now virtually no respite at all, with what was the fallback of having Hazelwood there. Now, if they do go off line, be it for scheduled maintenance, or if they go down because of a fault, then there is the added pressure that they need to come back on line as quickly as possible, because now, there is no backup.

This also shows something that coal fired power can do, and that is to operate at its maximum day in and day out, showing the reliability of coal fired power, and just confirms what I have been saying all along.

When it comes to coal fired power, there just is no substitute.

Anton Lang uses the screen name of TonyfromOz, and he writes at this site, PA Pundits International on topics related to electrical power generation, from all sources, concentrating mainly on Renewable Power, and how the two most favoured methods of renewable power generation, Wind Power and all versions of Solar Power, fail comprehensively to deliver levels of power required to replace traditional power generation. His Bio is at this link.

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