Australian Base Load Electrical Power – Week Ending 24th March 2018

Posted on Sun 03/25/2018 by

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By Anton Lang ~

Week 38

This is the continuing Post, where each Saturday, I will detail the power consumption for the Base Load in Australia for the previous week. This will show what is actually meant by the term Base Load, and that is the minimum daily power consumption at its lowest point. Power consumption never falls below this point.

Here in Australia, that level of power is 18,000MW. (See data for the Running Weekly Average For Base Load below)

The Bayswater Coal Fired Power Plant In New South Wales

This data I have collated below is for this last week, and is for the five States connected to the Australian grids, every State east of the Western Australian border, and here I will show that data for each of those five States, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania.

As you can see from these numbers, that huge amount of power is being supplied mainly by coal fired power, and on most days that coal fired power provides 80% or more of that level of power, at that time, when power consumption is at its lowest level, that total of 18,000MW.

All of this data is taken at a single point in time, and that is at 4AM of every day, when nearly all of us are sound asleep.

For the Introduction and background for this Base Load, refer back to the original Post at this link.

This is the permanent link to all the Posts with the data from each week.

For the purposes of this data, the sources are as follows.

Total Power consumption for each State

Fossil Fuel totals and Coal Fired power totals

Hydro Power totals

Wind Power totals

All these totals are from 4AM on each day, the time of minimum power consumption.

There are no coal fired power plants in South Australia or in Tasmania.

*****

Sunday 18th March 2018

New South Wales – 6120MW (Coal Fired Power – 4500MW)

Queensland – 5470MW (Coal Fired Power – 5300MW)

Victoria – 3830MW (Coal Fired Power – 3300MW)

South Australia – 950MW

Tasmania – 920MW

Total – 17290MW

Fossil Fuel – 14400MW (Total coal fired power – 13100MW  – 75.8% of the overall total of 17020MW)

Hydro – 400MW

Wind – 2800MW (16.5% of the total)

Renewable power – 18.8% of the total.

Sunday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 25730MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18300MW (71.1%)

Monday 19th March 2018

New South Wales – 6770MW (Coal Fired Power – 5400MW)

Queensland – 5620MW (Coal Fired Power – 5400MW)

Victoria – 3730MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 960MW

Tasmania – 900MW

Total – 17980MW

Fossil Fuel – 15800MW (Total coal fired power – 14600MW  – 81.2% of the overall total of 17980MW)

Hydro – 600MW

Wind – 1800MW (10% of the total)

Renewable power – 13.3% of the total.

Monday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 27730MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18400MW (66.4%)

Tuesday 20th March 2018

New South Wales – 6840MW (Coal Fired Power – 6000MW)

Queensland – 5780MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Victoria – 3870MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1120MW

Tasmania – 970MW

Total – 18580MW

Fossil Fuel – 16800MW (Total coal fired power – 15300MW  – 82.3% of the overall total of 18580MW)

Hydro – 1000MW

Wind – 1000MW (5.4% of the total)

Renewable power – 10.8% of the total.

Tuesday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 24520MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18300MW (74.6%)

Wednesday 21st March 2018

New South Wales – 6430MW (Coal Fired Power – 4500MW)

Queensland – 5640MW (Coal Fired Power – 5200MW)

Victoria – 3760MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1110MW

Tasmania – 970MW

Total – 17910MW

Fossil Fuel – 14700MW (Total coal fired power – 13500MW  – 75.4% of the overall total of 17910MW)

Hydro – 400MW

Wind – 3000MW (16.8% of the total)

Renewable power – 19% of the total.

Wednesday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 23630MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18100MW (76.6%)

Thursday 22nd March 2018

New South Wales – 6370MW (Coal Fired Power – 5000MW)

Queensland – 5580MW (Coal Fired Power – 5700MW)

Victoria – 3830MW (Coal Fired Power – 3700MW)

South Australia – 1150MW

Tasmania – 960MW

Total – 17890MW

Fossil Fuel – 16000MW (Total coal fired power – 14400MW  – 80.5% of the overall total of 17890MW)

Hydro – 600MW

Wind – 1700MW (9.5% of the total)

Renewable power – 12.9% of the total.

Thursday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 24620MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 17900MW (72.7%)

Friday 23rd March 2018

New South Wales – 6440MW (Coal Fired Power – 4600MW)

Queensland – 5570MW (Coal Fired Power – 5600MW)

Victoria – 3910MW (Coal Fired Power – 3700MW)

South Australia – 1090MW

Tasmania – 860MW

Total – 17870MW

Fossil Fuel – 15000MW (Total coal fired power – 13900MW  – 77.8% of the overall total of 17870MW)

Hydro – 600MW

Wind – 2400MW (13.4% of the total)

Renewable power – 16.8% of the total.

Friday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 24680MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18000MW (72.9%)

Saturday 24th March 2018

New South Wales – 6030MW (Coal Fired Power – 4600MW)

Queensland – 5430MW (Coal Fired Power – 5500MW)

Victoria – 3940MW (Coal Fired Power – 3800MW)

South Australia – 1120MW

Tasmania – 940MW

Total – 17460MW

Fossil Fuel – 15400MW (Total coal fired power – 13900MW  – 79.6% of the overall total of 17460MW)

Hydro – 750MW

Wind – 1800MW (10.3% of the total)

Renewable power – 12.9% of the total.

Saturday Peak Power at 6PM – Total Power Consumption – 22960MW and Coal Fired Power supplied 18400MW (80%)

*****

This Week’s Average For Base Load – 17816MW

This Week’s Average For Base Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 14100MW – 79.1%

Running Weekly Average For Base Load – 18070MW

Running Weekly Average For Base Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 14609MW – 80.8%

*****

This Week’s Average For Peak Load – 24839MW

This Week’s Average For Peak Load Supplied from Coal Fired Power – 18200MW – 73.3%

*****

Comments For This Last Week

As you can see from this week’s data, power consumption at that 4AM point in time is beginning to fall ever so slowly as we enter the benign Months of Autumn before the increase for Winter starts to take effect as the cooler Months kick in. The Running Average for that Base Load figure dropped slightly, as did the amount of power supplied from coal fired power. Those falls were only minimal , and as is still obvious, the percentage supplied by coal fired power is still over 80%. While that Base Load figure dropped, the Peak Power stayed relatively steady at around 25000MW with coal fired power still supplying the bulk of it. As you can still see, the amount of power supplied from Wind Power is up and down. Sometimes as high as supplying 17% and sometimes as low as only 5%, but read that again, as even at its highest, it’s still only 17%. You just cannot run a Country on only 17% of what is required at the absolute minimum power consumption. That power NEEDS to be stable, it NEEDS to be reliable, and as you can see, it also NEEDS to be in a huge amount.

Doing this Series, now into its 38th week, has only confirmed one thing for me. As I mentioned a week or so back, I’ve now been contributing Posts for ten years. A number of times, I have been a little concerned about some of the things I have written about, mainly because I seem to be the only person, or one among so very few anyway, who are sying things like this, that wind power is not the saviour it is made out to be, that wind power cannot replace coal fired power, which was also the case years back when it was perceived that it was just a sideways move from coal fired power to wind power, something patently untrue.

So, when I write about it, sometimes I feel like I’m taking my heart in my hands, thinking that sooner or later, I will be proved wrong.

That was what concerned me about that figure of 18000MW the Base Load I continually mention. As much as I look, no one else is even mentioning it. It’s like it just doesn’t exist. It’s sometimes so infuriating, that no one is mentioning it, almost as if it doesn’t exist, a fabricated figure to make a point.

The problem with that, that no one mentions it, is that all the data is done on a State wide basis, and even though the individual States, well, three of them anyway, have large power consumption, it seems to me that no one has bothered to add those figures together to come up with that total of that 180000MW.

One day, someone will add them together and ask the obvious question, Just where does all that power come from?

What does get traction is that the State of South Australia is getting traction with their reliance upon renewable power, especially wind power. They (quite rightly) say that their State has 40% of its power supplied from wind power. People falsely assume that because this is a State, then it stands to reason that all the other States can do the same. What is never mentioned when this is stated is that the State of South Australia only consumes a little less than 6% of the total power being consumed in Australia. Even then, the State still has gas fired power being supplied for 50% of the State’s power requirement, When there is such a small total to work with, then it is a lot simpler to supply a small total than a large total.

Those three larger States, New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria consume almost 90% of the total power being consumed in Australia, well, the AEMO major coverage area anyway.

So, we have a case of South Australia having 40% of its power coming from wind power, a State consuming 6% of the total, so in effect, the wind power in that State s barely 40% of 6%, or only 2.4% of Australia’s total power.

Wind power on an Australia wide basis is barely managing 5% of what is actually required to run the Country, and no amount of huge monetary outlay will make that wind power into a total which can run the Country, because in reality, it’s not even running the State of South Australia.

Each State has a target for renewable power, and those targets will never be achieved.

In the meantime, coal fired power just rolls along, supplying what it always has supplied, and that’s 80% of the Minimum figure, and that 80% is across the whole day, and coal fired power ramps up every day from that low amount to supply more power across each and every day. And what they want to do everywhere is to shut down coal fired power plants.

When it comes to the supply of power to keep the Country of Australia running, there really is no substitute for coal fired power.

Anton Lang uses the screen name of TonyfromOz, and he writes at this site, PA Pundits International on topics related to electrical power generation, from all sources, concentrating mainly on Renewable Power, and how the two most favoured methods of renewable power generation, Wind Power and all versions of Solar Power, fail comprehensively to deliver levels of power required to replace traditional power generation. His Bio is at this link.

OzBaseLoadTFO

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