Tropical Storm Ana (Central Pacific) at Hawaii

Posted on Tue 10/21/2014 by

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Ana (Central Pacific)
October 21, 2014
MODIS image of Ana
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii on Oct. 20 at 23:55 UTC (7:55 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit:
NASA’s Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA’s Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Ana Still Affecting HawaiiSlow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA’s Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space. Imagery from Aqua showed that wind shear was affecting the storm.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii on Oct. 20 at 23:55 UTC (7:55 p.m. EDT).  The image showed that most of the clouds and showers were north and east of the center of circulation, pushed away from the center by strong southwesterly wind shear.

The MODIS image showed clouds in Ana’s eastern quadrant covered the islands of Kauai and Niihau. Kauai is geologically the oldest of the main Hawaiian Islands and fourth largest of the main islands in the Hawaiian archipelago. Niʻihau or Niihau is the seventh largest of the inhabited Hawaiian Islands.

A tropical storm warning is still in effect for parts of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from Nihoa to Maro Reef.  The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that rainfall totals of 4 to 8, locally up to 12, inches are possible over the northwestern Hawaiian Islands near the center of the storm.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) Ana’s maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph) and little change in strength is forecast through early Thursday. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.8 north and longitude 165.4 west. Ana’s center was about 215 miles (345 km) south-southeast of French Frigate Shoals.  The French Frigate Shoals is the largest atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Ana was moving toward the west near 9 mph (14 kph) but the storm is expected to gradually become northerly through early Thursday, Oct. 22. The estimated minimum central pressure is 999 millibars.

CPHC warnings cited large swells produced by Ana will build across the northwest Hawaiian Islands through Wednesday. Surf produced by these swells will be dangerous along the southern and southeastern facing reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands.

The CPHC expects Ana to curve to the northeast and start transitioning into an extra-tropical storm on Friday, Oct. 24.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


October 20, 2014
MODIS Image of Ana
NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana blanketing the Hawaiian Islands on Oct. 19 at 21:45 UTC (5:45 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit:
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
This video shows the movement of Tropical Storm Ana near the Hawaiian Islands from Oct. 17-20.
Image Credit:
NASA/NOAA GOES Project

NASA’s Terra Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii

Tropical Storm Ana made a slow track west of the Hawaiian islands over the last couple of days, and by Oct. 20 was moving westward away from the main Hawaiian islands and heading toward the northwest Hawaiian islands. NASA’s Terra satellite caught Ana on a flyby on Oct. 19 that showed the storm’s clouds blanketing the chain of islands.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible picture of Tropical Storm Ana blanketing the Hawaiian Islands on Oct. 19 at 21:45 UTC (5:45 p.m. EDT). At the time, the strongest thunderstorms appeared to be in the eastern and western quadrants of the storm.

On Monday, Oct. 20, a tropical storm warning was in effect for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from Nihoa to French Frigate Shoals. A hurricane watch was in effect for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from Nihoa to Maro Reef.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) Tropical Storm Ana was just below hurricane strength with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kph). NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) expects weakening today, but intensification on Oct. 20. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.6 north and longitude 162.6 west. That puts the center of Ana about 225 miles (360 km) west-southwest of Lihue Hawaii and about 325 miles (525 km) southeast of French Frigate Shoals.  Ana is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 kph) and is expected to gradually turn to the northwest.

For updates on warnings and local conditions, please visit NOAA’s CPHC website: http://www.prh.noaa.gov. 

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


GOES image of Ana
NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean on Oct. 17 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit:
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
This video of NOAA’s GOES-West satellite imagery from Oct. 14-17 shows the movement and strengthening of Tropical Storm Ana approaching Hawaii.
Image Credit:
NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Oct. 17, 2014 – Satellites Sees a Question Mark in Tropical Storm Ana

NOAA’s GOES-West satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Ana that showed the outer clouds were already reaching the big island by 11 a.m. EDT and the storm resembled a giant question mark.

Tropical Storm Ana was nearing hurricane strength mid-day on Oct. 17 and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) expects the storm to become a hurricane before reaching the big island of Hawaii.

NOAA’s GOES-West satellite took an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Ana as it was approaching Hawaii on Oct. 17 at 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST). Ana looked like a giant question mark in the infrared image, as a large band of thunderstorms wrapped into the center from the eastern side of the storm and extended south of the storm.

Despite the storm looking like a question mark from space, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center said that there is no question the storm has been intensifying.

A Tropical Storm Watch remained in effect for Hawaii County on Oct. 17. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, in this case within 24 to 36 hours. Interests elsewhere in the main Hawaiian Islands, and in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument Area, should monitor the progress of Ana.

The CPHC expects tropical-storm-force winds to affect the Big Island of Hawaii by tonight, Oct. 17. In addition, heavy rainfall with total rain accumulations between 6 and 8 inches, with isolated totals of 12 inches are possible. Heavy rain could potentially affect the other islands Saturday and Sunday. This rainfall could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

In addition to the winds and heavy rainfall, dangerous surf will precede and Ana. CPHC noted that large swells are expected to build over the eastern end of the main Hawaiian island chain today (Oct. 17) through Saturday. These large swells will continue to spread up the island chain through the weekend. Surf produced by these swells could potentially be damaging along exposed south and southeast shorelines beginning later today and Saturday, and persisting through the weekend in some areas.

At 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST) maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kph) and Ana is expected to become a hurricane later in the day with gradual weakening expected Saturday and Sunday. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 15.7 north, longitude 154.2 west. Ana was moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph)

Ana is expected to turn slightly to the northwest and slow over the weekend of Oct. 18 and 19. After a brief stint as a hurricane overnight Oct.17 and early Oct. 18 when it will be west of the Big Island, it is expected to weaken back to a tropical storm and move almost parallel to the Hawaiian Islands while remaining over water, west of the islands. By mid-week next week, around Oct. 18, the CPHC expects Ana to track through the French Frigate Shoals.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


Terra image of Ana
On Oct. 15 at 20:30 UTC (4:30 p.m. EDT) NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit:
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
This animation of NOAA’s GOES-West satellite data from Oct.13-16 shows the intensification and movement of Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit:
NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Satellites Tracking Central Pacific’s Tropical Storm Ana

Tropical Storm Ana continued on a path to the Hawaiian Islands as NASA’s Terra satellite passed overhead and gathered data on the storm. NOAA’s GOES-West satellite data was compiled into a movie that showed the intensification and movement of Ana. Watches are now in effect for Hawaii.

NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) has issued a Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii County, Hawaii. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, in this case within 36 to 48 hours. Life-threatening surf and riptide conditions will start to affect the Hawaiian Islands from Thursday onwards. Heavy rainfall will reach the Big Island on Friday, causing life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

Interests elsewhere in the main Hawaiian Islands, and in the Papahanaumokuakea marine national monument area from Necker to French Frigate Shoals, should monitor the progress of Ana. Watches May be required for additional areas in the main Hawaiian Islands later today.

CPHC noted that tropical storm conditions are possible on the Big Island of Hawaii starting late Friday, Oct.17. In addition, large swells produced by Ana are possible over the eastern end of the main Hawaiian island chain starting late tonight and Friday morning. These large swells will continue to spread up the island chain through the weekend. Surf produced by these swells could potentially be damaging along exposed shorelines beginning late Friday and Saturday, and persisting through the weekend in some areas.  Heavy rainfall associated with Ana may reach the Big Island of Hawaii Friday afternoon. These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

At the NASA/NOAA GOES Project office at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, infrared and visible image of Tropical Storm Ana were compiled from Oct. 13 through Oct. 16 and made into a movie that showed the intensification and movement of Ana. NOAA manages the GOES-West satellite.

NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Oct. 15 at 20:30 UTC (4:30 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer captured a visible image of the storm that showed extent of the rounded clouds. The storm appeared so rounded that it looked like a white sun.

At 500 a.m. HST (9 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC) on Oct. 16, Ana’s maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph) and gradual strengthening is expected and Ana is expected to become a hurricane on Friday, Oct. 17.

The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 14.1 north, longitude 150.3 west. That’s about 500 miles (805 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.  Ana is moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest on Oct. 17. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars.

Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Saturday, Oct. 18 and then tracking parallel to the islands over the two days following. For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


MODIS image of Ana
On Oct. 14 at 22:50 UTC (6:50 p.m. EDT) NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit:
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Oct. 15, 2014 – NASA’s Aqua Satellite Watches Tropical Storm Ana Intensifying

NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over intensifying Tropical Storm Ana as it was moving through the Central Pacific Ocean and toward the Hawaiian Islands.

On Oct. 14 at 22:50 UTC (6:50 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean. The MODIS image showed a tight concentration of thunderstorms surrounding the center of Ana’s circulation.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/5 a.m. HST) on Wed. Oct. 15, Tropical Storm Ana’s maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kph). Ana is forecast to gradually intensify through Thursday night, and it may become a hurricane later today or tonight, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 14.3 north, longitude 146.5 west. That’s about 680 miles (1095 km) southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Ana is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 kph), and this general motion is expected to continue today, with a gradual turn toward the west northwest expected tonight or early Thursday, and this motion is expected to continue through late Thursday.

Ana is expected to begin causing life-threatening surf and riptide conditions through the Hawaiian Islands beginning Thursday, Oct. 16. CPHC noted that surf produced by these swells may be potentially damaging along some shorelines starting on Friday. There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect, however, a hurricane watch may be required for portions of the main Hawaiian Islands later today or tonight (Oct. 15).

Ana is moving northwest and intensifying. The CPHC expects Ana to become a hurricane late on Oct. 15. By the weekend of Oct. 18-19, Ana is forecast to approach the main Hawaiian Islands.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


AIRS image of Ana
NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 at 11:11 UTC (7:11 a.m. EDT) and captured infrared imagery showing some strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops (purple).
Image Credit:
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Oct. 14, 2014 – NASA’s Aqua Satellite Spots Central Pacific’s Tropical Storm Ana

NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.

Ana formed on Oct. 13 at 5 p.m. EDT (11 a.m. HST) as Tropical Depression 2-C, about 920 miles (1,480 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. By 9 p.m. EDT that day, the depression had strengthened into Tropical Depression Ana.

NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 at 11:11 UTC (7:11 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument gathered infrared data that showed some strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops had developed around the center of circulation.

At 500 am HST, 1500 UTC, Ana’s maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph) and gradual strengthening is expected through early Thursday morning. The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 13.4 north, longitude 143.3 west. That’s about 895 miles (1,440 km) east-southeast of Hilo Hawaii.  Ana is moving toward the northwest near 5 mph (7 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through early Thursday morning. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars.

Currently, NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center has no watches or warnings in effect. However, Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane over the next couple of days, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Sunday, Oct. 19. For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center